San Francisco Sourdough Bread
With a crisp crust, a light crumb, and a tangy taste, this sourdough bread is an excellent version of the world-famous bread from the City by the Bay.
Yield: 1 loaf
Ingredients
Small Loaf (1 lb. bread machine)
  • ½ cup, plus 1 Tbsp warm tap water
  • ¾ cup Sourdough Starter (see link in instructions for starter recipe)
  • 2¼ cups bread flour
  • 1½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1½ tsp RED STAR Active Dry Yeast
Medium Loaf (1½ lb. bread machine)
  • ¾ cup, plus 1 Tbsp warm tap water
  • 1 cup Sourdough Starter (see link in instructions for starter recipe)
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 package (2¼ tsp, ¼oz, 7g) RED STAR Active Dry Yeast
Large Loaf (2 lb. bread machine)
  • ¾ cup, plus 2 Tbsp warm tap water
  • 1¼ cups Sourdough Starter (see link in instructions for starter recipe)
  • 4 cups bread flour
  • 2½ tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 Tbsp RED STAR Active Dry Yeast
  • Cornmeal (for dusting on baking sheet)
Instructions
  1. Get starter recipe here >> Sourdough Starter recipe
Bread Machine Method
  1. Have water at 80ºF and all other ingredients at room temperature. Place ingredients in pan in the order specified in your owner’s manual. Select basic cycle and medium/normal crust. Do not use delay timer. Check dough consistency after 5 minutes of kneading. The dough should be in a soft, tacky ball. If it is dry and stiff, add water, ½ to 1 tablespoon at a time. If it is too wet and sticky, add 1 tablespoon of flour at a time. Remove bread when cycle is finished; cool. See our Bread Machine section for more helpful tips and information.
Mixer Methods
  1. Hand-Held Mixer Method: Using ingredient amounts listed for medium loaf, combine yeast, 1 cup flour, and other dry ingredients in mixing bowl. Add sourdough starter and water and mix on low speed. Beat 2 to 3 minutes on medium speed. Using a wooden spoon or dough whisk, stir in enough remaining flour to make a firm dough. Knead on floured surface 5 to 7 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Use additional flour if necessary.

  2. Stand Mixer Method: Using ingredient amounts listed for medium loaf, combine yeast, 1 cup flour, and other dry ingredients in mixer bowl. Add sourdough starter and water/ mix with paddle or beaters for 4 minutes on medium speed. Gradually add remaining flour and knead with dough hook(s) 5 to 7 minutes until smooth and elastic. Use additional flour if necessary.

  3. Food Processor Method: Using ingredient amounts listed for medium loaf, combine yeast, 1 cup flour, and other dry ingredients in food processor bowl with steel blade. Add sourdough starter. While motor is running, add water. Process until mixed. Continue processing, adding enough of the remaining flour until dough forms a ball.
Rising, Shaping, and Baking
  1. Place dough in lightly oiled bowl and turn to grease top. Cover; let rise until dough tests ripe. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; punch down to remove air bubbles. Roll or pat into a 12 x 5-inch rectangle. Starting with shorter side, roll up tightly, pressing dough into roll. Pinch edges and taper ends to seal. Place on baking sheet that is lined with parchment paper or silicone mat; sprinkle with cornmeal. Cover; let rise until indentation remains after touching. With very sharp knife, make 2 or 3 diagonal slashes across top of loaf. Spray or brush loaf with cold water. Bake in preheated 400º F oven 30 to 35 minutes. For a crisper crust, spray or brush loaf with cold water several times during the first 12 minutes of baking. Remove from cookie sheet; cool.

  2. *You can substitute Instant (fast-rising) yeast in place of Active Dry Yeast. When using Instant Yeast, expect your dough to rise faster. Always let your dough rise until ripe. Traditional methods: use equal amounts; Bread Machine: use ½ tsp Instant Yeast OR ¾ tsp Active Dry Yeast per cup of flour in your recipe. Visit our Lessons in Yeast & Baking for more information on baking.

  3. Recipe featured at My Kitchen Addiction.
 

5 Comments
  1. How would you adjust this recipe for high altitude? I live at about 6000 feet, and in wyoming where it us a lot cooler. Also would i need to adjust anything in my starter for the altitude?

    • Hi Bryan,
      Here’s information on baking in high altitude climates (taken from our FAQs):
      The low atmospheric pressure at high altitudes allows yeasted doughs to rise faster causing the dough to over proof. Recipes need to be adapted for lower quantities of yeast as altitude increases. This will slow down the rising time so that the dough has time to develop a good flavor and texture.

      When baking at higher altitudes, use regular active dry yeast and use 1/2 teaspoon for each cup of flour, though this will vary from one location to the next. You will have to experiment with what works best for your area.

      In dry climates, flour is drier, causing dough to require slightly more liquid. In addition, liquids evaporate faster at higher altitudes. When using a bread machine, it is extremely important that the dough be checked about 5 minutes into the kneading cycle. Without stopping the machine, raise the lid and touch the dough ball. Look for a soft, slightly tacky dough. Correct a dry, stiff dough by adding more liquid, a teaspoon at a time.

      The addition of gluten to bread recipes at high altitude will protect cell structure of the dough from stretching too much and giving a coarse texture to the finished bread product. Use 1 teaspoon of gluten for each cup of flour in the recipe.

      Colorado State University has recently revised Making Yeast Breads at High Altitudes, to include bread machine and knead-your-own bread recipes and trouble shooting tips. Visit http://www.cerc.colostate.edu for call 877.692.9358 for more information.

      You do not need to make any adjustments to your starter.

      I hope you will find this information helpful.
      Carol

  2. Your stand mixer recipe says to follow the medium loaf recipe, can you use the large loaf recipe instead, or even double the medium loaf recipe if the mixer is large enough?

  3. A great recipe and very tasty. I am a new baker trying to learn all I can. I am reading everything on baking, types of bread,about flours many other things. I am going to get bread maker for my birthday. I am going to be a great baker. Awesome recipe!!!!

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